Treatment and Control

Typically when clinical mastitis is detected, the cow is milked out and then given an intra-mammary infusion of antibiotic, i.e. infused directly into the infected gland. Prior to intra-mammary infusion, the teat is cleaned well and the tip of the teat is swabbed with an alcohol swab and allowed to dry for a number of seconds. The antibiotic comes in plastic tube with a plastic infusion cannula on the end. After emptying the antibiotic tube, the teat is pinched off and the antibiotic fluid is palpated up into the gland.

Vaccinations for mastitis do exist, but as they only reduce the severity of the condition, and do not prevent new inflection they should be used in conjunction with a mastitis prevention program.

Awareness of the economic losses associated with mastitis is resulting in a desire for mastitis control programs. Control programs are focused on detection of mastits by the identification of the causative agent and prevention of transmission by removing the source of the agent (milk contaminated fomites, bedding, persistently infected cows, etc.) Practices such as good nutrition, proper milking hygiene, and the Segregating & Removing of chronically infected cows can also help. Ensuring that cows have clean, dry bedding decreases the risk of infection and transmission. Dairy workers should wear gloves while milking, and machines should be cleaned regularly to decrease the incidence of transmission. Application of teat dip or spray, such as iodine is vital before and after milking to remove the growth medium for bacteria.

Mastitis Causing Bacteria

Disease causing bacteria are often referred to as pathogens. The most common mastitis pathogens are found either in the udder (con- tagious pathogens) or the cow’s surroundings (environmental pathogens), such as bedding, manure, soil, etc.Read more →

After effects of mastitis on milk

Mastitis resulting from major presence of pathogens causes considerable compositional changes in milk. The types of proteins present change dramatically. Casein, the major milk protein of high nutritional quality, declines and lower quality whey proteins increase which adversely impacts dairy product quality, such as cheese yield, flavour and quality.Read more →

Consequences of Mastitis

Mastitis treatment and control is one of the largest costs to the dairy industry and is also a significant factor in dairy cow welfare. Losses arise from reduction in yields due to illness and any permanent damage to udder tissue, Read more →

Treatment and Control

Typically when clinical mastitis is detected, the cow is milked out and then given an intra-mammary infusion of antibiotic, i.e. infused directly into the infected gland. Prior to intra-mammary infusion, the teat is cleaned well and the tip of the teat is swabbed with an alcohol swab and allowed to dry for a number of seconds.Read more →

Somatic Cell Count

Somatic cell count (SCC) is the number of somatic cells found in a millilitre of milk. Somatic cells (or “body” cells) are a mixture of milk-producing cells shed from the udder tissue (about 2%) and cells from the immune system (the other 98%), known as leukocytes (also called white blood cells).Read more →