Consequences of Mastitis

Mastitis treatment and control is one of the largest costs to the dairy industry and is also a significant factor in dairy cow welfare. Losses arise from reduction in yields due to illness and any permanent damage to udder tissue, the cost of reduced longevity due to premature Segregating & Removing, milk thrown away due to contamination by medication or being unfit to drink, the extra labour required to tend to mastitic cows and the costs of veterinary care and medicine . Estimates of milk yield loss due to subclinical mastitis range from 100 to 500 kg/cow per lactation . In case of clinical mastitis in cows the milk yield loss is estimated to range from almost 700 kg/cow in first lactation and 1200 kg/cow in second or higher lactation.

» Mastitis costs the U.S. dairy industry about $1.7-2 billion annually or 11% of total U.S. milk production. Much of this cost is attributed to reduced milk production, dis-carded milk, and replacements which are estimated at an overall loss of $ 200 per cow per year.

» UK

» In case of India various studies have reported that subclinical mastitis is 15 to 40 times more prevalent than clinical mastitis and is generally of longer duration . Some recent studies indicate prevalence of subclinical mastitis ranging from 20 to 83 per cent in cows and 45 per cent in buffaloes. Staphylococcus spp have been reported to be the main etiological agents of mastitis in cattle and buffaloes. Estimates of annual economic loss incurred by dairy industry on account of udder infections average around Rs 6053 crores and out of which loss of Rs 4356 crores has been attributed to subclinical mastitis (refer National Academy of Agricultural Sciences , September 2013)

Mastitis Causing Bacteria

Disease causing bacteria are often referred to as pathogens. The most common mastitis pathogens are found either in the udder (con- tagious pathogens) or the cow’s surroundings (environmental pathogens), such as bedding, manure, soil, etc.Read more →

After effects of mastitis on milk

Mastitis resulting from major presence of pathogens causes considerable compositional changes in milk. The types of proteins present change dramatically. Casein, the major milk protein of high nutritional quality, declines and lower quality whey proteins increase which adversely impacts dairy product quality, such as cheese yield, flavour and quality.Read more →

Consequences of Mastitis

Mastitis treatment and control is one of the largest costs to the dairy industry and is also a significant factor in dairy cow welfare. Losses arise from reduction in yields due to illness and any permanent damage to udder tissue, Read more →

Treatment and Control

Typically when clinical mastitis is detected, the cow is milked out and then given an intra-mammary infusion of antibiotic, i.e. infused directly into the infected gland. Prior to intra-mammary infusion, the teat is cleaned well and the tip of the teat is swabbed with an alcohol swab and allowed to dry for a number of seconds.Read more →

Somatic Cell Count

Somatic cell count (SCC) is the number of somatic cells found in a millilitre of milk. Somatic cells (or “body” cells) are a mixture of milk-producing cells shed from the udder tissue (about 2%) and cells from the immune system (the other 98%), known as leukocytes (also called white blood cells).Read more →